Drug and Alcohol Addiction Resources in Denver, Colorado2019-02-20T15:36:02+00:00

Denver, Colorado Drug and Alcohol Addiction Recovery Resource Guide

Overcoming a substance abuse problem can be very difficult. That is why most people fail when they attempt to recover on their own. The good news is that there are many alcohol and drug addiction recovery resources in Denver, Colorado. Whether you’re looking for AA meetings, NA meetings, or professional treatment options, help is available.

This detailed guide will look at the drug laws in Colorado, as well as the various addiction resources that are available. Our goal is to help you find the help that you need. If you have any further questions or if you need any extra help, reach out to us. We’ll connect you with the right resources.

Addiction can be so lonely, and people often feel like they are left to recover on their own.

Many people don’t feel supported when they attempt to recover. They will continue to use because they do not have the right tools and people by their side. Knowing where to look for the right resources can be helpful for both addicts and their families.

We would like to offer a list of resources for Denver for anyone who needs them. We are not affiliated with any of these organizations, but only provide them for informational purposes.

Drug Addiction Facts About Denver, CO

A study released in 2017 found that Colorado had the third-most-serious drug problem out of all states in the U.S. Both teenagers and adults were frequent drug users. With that said, teenage marijuana use is actually lower than the national average in this state.

This study looks at all substances, from prescription opioids to marijuana. Marijuana is actually a legal drug in Denver, Colorado, so this might skew the numbers a bit. Although marijuana is legal, it doesn’t necessarily mean that a person cannot grow dependent on this drug to function.

“In 2013, approximately 9.4% of Americans struggled with a substance use disorder (SUD).”

Even when taking everything into account, there’s no denying that Denver, Colorado has a huge drug problem on its hands. Many residents regularly abuse and misuse drugs, leading to addiction.

Let’s take a look at some facts and statistics on this area.

  • 959 Coloradans died of a drug-related overdose in 2017. These numbers are rising as 912 Coloradans died from unintentional overdoses in 2016, and less than 400 Coloradans died from the same cause in 2000.
  • 536 Coloradans died of an opioid-related overdose in 2016. From 2012 to 2016, the number of heroin-related overdose deaths rose from 91 to 234.
  • 224,000 Coloradans misuse prescription drugs every year. This is, despite, the falling prescription rates each year. In 2013, approximately 11.3% of prescriptions were for opioids, and over 710 providers prescribed high dose opioids for 30 days and up. In contrast, only 9% of all prescriptions were for opioids in 2016. The number of providers who prescribed high dose opioids for 30 days and up dropped to 288.
  • Neonatal addiction, which is when babies are born addicted to drugs, is up 91% in Colorado. When mothers take prescription opioids while pregnant, the opioids can travel through the bloodstream to the fetus. This causes the baby to become dependent on the drugs as well. In 2011, 7.8% of pregnant women in Colorado reported smoking and 10.1% reported drinking alcohol in the last trimester.
  • Marijuana-related auto accidents are happening more frequently. From 2013 to 2016, there was a 40% increase in fatal crashes in Colorado. The number of drivers who tested positive for marijuana use jumped from 47 in 2013 to 115 in 2016. That’s a 145% increase!

Drug and alcohol abuse and misuse are prevalent in Denver, Colorado. It affects anyone. Colorado is already taking proactive measures to reduce addiction and overdose rates. Those who suspect that they have an addiction should do what’s best for themselves and get help. There are plenty of resources here.

Drug Laws in Colorado

Understanding drug laws in Colorado can be difficult. Drug laws can be complicated and complex. There is also always some room for interpretation. Also, most of the time, those who are charged with drug possession, manufacturing or trafficking will face charges that are more serious than what they deserve.

To understand drug laws, you must first understand what drugs are legal and what drugs are illegal. Take a look at the table below for more information.

Legal Substances

Marijuana is legal in Colorado in a sense. Possession of fewer than 28 grams by anyone over the age of 21 is completely legal.

With that said, this substance is not completely legal. There are still some restrictions in place. Unfortunately, it is still illegal to:

  • Possess more than 28 grams of marijuana
  • Possess marijuana if you are under the age of 21
  • Have marijuana on your person when on federally owned property within the state of Colorado, such as at airports, courthouses, National Parks, post offices and HUD housing

Illegal Drugs

In essence, every other substance is illegal in Denver, Colorado. While prescription drugs are legal for those with the prescription, those who obtain the drugs without a prescription are possessing it illegally.

The various illegal substances in Colorado are separated into 5 different categories. They include:

  • Schedule I. These drugs come with a high potential for abuse. They are not used medically and are deemed unsafe. Examples of schedule I drugs include heroin and hallucinogens like LSD.
  • Schedule II. These drugs have some accepted medical use, but they are highly addictive. Using these drugs could lead to both a physical and chemical dependence to it. Schedule II drugs include prescription opioids, like oxycodone, and stimulants, like cocaine.
  • Schedule III. These drugs have an accepted medical use, but they also come with a moderate potential for abuse. These drugs include barbiturates, ketamine, and anabolic steroids.
  • Schedule IV.  These drugs have a lower potential for abuse than Schedule III drugs. These drugs have medical uses. Common examples include sleep medications like Ambien and anti-anxiety medications like diazepam.
  • Schedule V. These are the least dangerous drugs and come with the lowest potential for abuse. They are often used for medical purposes. Schedule V drugs include cold medications and over-the-counter cough syrup.

Penalties and Charges

The possession, sale, manufacturing or trafficking of any drugs on the illegal list is a crime. In general, unlawful possession of small quantities meant for personal use will be classified as a misdemeanor.

Anything more serious than that may be classified as a felony. Penalties for felony drug offenses tend to be a lot more serious and can include both hefty fines and prison time. The severity of the charges will depend on the type of drugs and the quantity involved and whether the drugs were for personal use or for a large-scale operation. Understanding the different schedules of controlled substances is vital to understanding how the law works.

Drug charges are essentially separated into 6 different classes. 2 of the classes are misdemeanors, while the other 4 are felonies. They’ll be explored in detail in the section below.

Misdemeanor Charges

Misdemeanor charges in Colorado are separated into two different classes. Level 1 misdemeanors are more serious, and those who face these charges will also tend to face more serious repercussions.

Level 1 Misdemeanor

A level 1 misdemeanor is more serious than a level 1 misdemeanor. A level 1 misdemeanor includes:

  • A criminal attempt or intentionally engaging in any activity that is a step towards a level 4 drug felony.
  • A criminal conspiracy, as in agreeing to attempt to commit a level 4 drug felony with anyone. This may include agreeing to plan, commission or even attempt a level 4 drug felony.
  • Unlawful possession of any quantity of schedule III, IV or V controlled substances.
  • Unlawful distribution, manufacturing, dispensing, sale or possession of any schedule V controlled substance or less than 4 grams of any schedule III or IV controlled substances.

The minimum penalty for these offenses is 6 months in jail and/or $500 in fines. The maximum penalty is 18 months in jail and/or $1,500 in fines.

Those who are facing these charges can ask for a jury trial with 6 people. They can also ask to have the criminal case sealed from their record.

Although level 1 misdemeanors aren’t considered as serious crimes,  they may be deportable offenses.

Level 2 Misdemeanor

Level 2 drug misdemeanors are the least serious crimes that anyone can commit. They include things like:

  • A criminal attempt to complete a level 1 drug misdemeanor.
  • A criminal conspiracy to commit a level 1 misdemeanor. This can include activities like agreeing to plan the crime.
  • Unlawful use of a controlled substance that has not been dispensed by a professional licensed or authorized by law to administer, prescribe or dispense the substance.  
  • Unlawful possession of more than 2 ounces, but less than 6 ounces of marijuana.
  • Unlawful use or possession of synthetic cannabinoids or salvia divinorum.

The penalties for level 2 misdemeanors range from a minimum of $50 in fines to a maximum of 12 months imprisonment and/or $750 in fines.

Just like with level 1 misdemeanors, anyone facing a level 2 misdemeanor can demand a jury trial with 6 people. They can also ask for their criminal case to be sealed from their record.

Level 2 misdemeanors are not considered to be serious offenses. However,  they may still be deportable offenses depending on the situation.

Felony Charges

Drug felony charges are a lot more serious than misdemeanor charges. They’re also a lot more complicated, as many different factors are involved. Felony charges are separated into 4 different classes based on their seriousness and the types of drugs that were involved.

Level 1 Felony Charges

Level 1 felony charges are the most serious drug charges that anyone can face. Instances of level 1 felony charges include, but are not limited to:

  • Unlawful manufacturing, dispensing, sale, possession or distribution of:
    • More than 225 grams of a schedule I or II controlled substances;
    • More than 112 grams of a substance that contains methamphetamine, ketamine, heroin, or cathinone; or,
    • More than 50 milligrams of a substance that contains flunitrazepam
  • Unlawful manufacturing, dispensing, sale, possession or distribution of more than 2.5 pounds of marijuana or 1 pound of marijuana concentrate to a minor when the adult is more than 2 years older than the minor or more than 50 pounds of marijuana or more than 25 pounds of marijuana concentrate between minors

The penalties for level 1 felonies run steep. However, the penalties can be separated into a presumptive level or an aggravated level. There are tougher sentences for those who commit an aggravated level of offense.

Aggravated factors include if the defendant was on parole or if the defendant is facing another felony.

Presumptive Level 1

  • 8 to 32 years of jail time with a mandatory parole period of 3 years; and,
  • $5,000 to $1 million in fines

Aggravated Level 1

  • 12 to 32 years of jail time with a mandatory parole period of 3 years; and,
  • $5,000 to $1 million in fines

Level 2 Felony Charges

Level 2 felony charges are a step down from level 1 felony charges. Activities that are considered as level 2 felonies include, but are not limited to:

  • A criminal attempt to commit a level 1 drug felony
  • A criminal conspiracy to commit a level 1 drug felony
  • Unlawful manufacturing, dispensing, sale, possession or distribution of:
    • Between 14 and 225 grams of a schedule I or II controlled substances
    • Between 7 and 112 grams of ketamine, heroin, methamphetamine or cathinone
    • Between 10 and 50 milligrams of any substance containing flunitrazepam
    • A schedule III or IV controlled substance to a minor when the adult is at least two years older than the minor
    • Any materials to make amphetamine and methamphetamine

Once again, the penalties are separated based on whether there are any aggravating factors.

Presumptive Level 2

  • 4 to 8 years of jail time with a mandatory parole period of 2 years; and/or,
  • $3,000 to $750,000 in fines

Aggravated Level 2

  • 8 to 16 years of jail time with a mandatory parole period of 2 years; and,
  • $3,000 to $750,000 in fines

Level 3 Felony Charges

Level 3 felony charges are a step down from level 2 felony charges. They include activities like:

  • A criminal attempt at a level 2 drug felony
  • A criminal conspiracy to commit a level 2 drug felony
  • Unlawful manufacturing, dispensing, sale, possession or distribution of:
    • Less than 14 grams of any schedule I or II controlled substance
    • Less than 7 grams of methamphetamine, heroin, ketamine or cathinone
    • Less than 10 milligrams of any substance that contains flunitrazepam
    • Anywhere from 1 to 6 ounces of marijuana or 1.5 to 3 ounces of marijuana concentrate to a minor where the adult is at least two years older than the minor

Imitation substances and fraud related to drugs may also be considered level 3 felonies. Once again, the penalties are separated into two levels: presumptive and aggravated.

Presumptive Level 3

  • 2 to 4 years of jail time with a mandatory parole period of 1 year; and/or,
  • $2,000 to $500,000 in fines

Aggravated Level 3

  • 4 to 6 years of jail time with a mandatory parole period of 1 year; and,
  • $2,000 to $500,000 in fines

Level 4 Felony Charges

Level 4 felony charges are the least serious of felony charges. They include activities like:

  • A criminal attempt to commit a level 3 felony offense
  • A criminal conspiracy to commit a level 3 drug felony
  • Unlawful manufacturing, dispensing, sale, possession or distribution of:
    • Any material or compound that is less than 4 grams and contains a schedule III or IV controlled substance
    • Any substance that contains less than 2 grams of methamphetamine, heroin, ketamine or cathinone
    • Any material or compound that contains any quantity of ketamine, flunitrazepam or any schedule I or II controlled substance

Level 4 felony charges are also separated into either a presumptive or aggravated level.

Presumptive Level 4

  • 6 months to 1 year of jail time with a mandatory parole period of 1 year; and/or,
  • $1,000 to $100,000 in fines

Aggravated Level 4

  • 1 to 2 years of jail time with a mandatory parole period of 1 year; and,
  • $1,000 to $100,000 in fines

Is It Possible to Seal Drug Charges from Your Record?

Anyone who has a drug charge on their criminal record can ask for the record to be sealed. This process involves obtaining copies of past police reports, filing a petition with the court and paying a filing fee. It’s fairly simple. Anyone can petition to have a drug charge sealed from their record; however, there are some requirements based on the type of felony or misdemeanor that one was convicted of.

It’s important to note that sealing a drug charge will remove it from your criminal record. This is important for those who are looking to find employment. With that said, sealing a drug charge will not remove it from your record completely. Law enforcement officers can still access the files.

Adults who have a misdemeanor drug charge will need to wait three years to five years after the date of the final disposition to request for their files to be sealed. Level 4 felony drug convictions can be sealed 7 years after the date of the final disposition or from the date they were released from supervision related to a criminal conviction. This is if the prosecuting attorney does not object. Other drug-related offences may be sealed after 10 years.

Underage DUI convictions are usually sealed after the individual has reached 21 years of age. Convictions involving underage possession or consumption of alcohol or marijuana can be sealed after 1 year after the date of the final disposition or when the individual was released from any supervision related to the conviction.

Drug-Related Crimes in Recent News

2,000 women in Colorado are incarcerated. That’s sadly a fairly high number. Some of these women are incarcerated for drug-related crimes. Let’s take a look at some of the most recent headlines for drug-related crimes involving women in Colorado.

Two Female Inmates Charged with Selling Cocaine

Someone struggling with a drug addiction will still need her fix in jail. Surprisingly, many criminals smuggle in quite a lot of drugs into jails.

Two female inmates in Weld County were charged on January 14, 2019, for selling cocaine. They concealed the cocaine in powdered coffee and hot chocolate mixes. These products were then ingested by other inmates who needed a fix. The wardens found three laced drink mix bags with over 308 grams of products.

At this moment, deputies believe that the inmates sneaked the cocaine into jail by concealing it in their body cavities at the time of their booking.

Ellisville Women Charged with Selling Drugs to High Schoolers

A woman in Ellisville was shipping herself drugs from Colorado and then selling them to high school students in Ellisville. She purchased the drugs in bulk in Colorado and would repackage them in Ellisville. She would recruit younger students in high school to help her sell her products, which included marijuana, edibles, LSD, and Xanax.

Substance Use Prevention and Early Intervention Programs in Colorado

In 2017, Colorado received $7.8 million in federal funding to treat its growing opioid epidemic. The Office of Behavioral Health, Community Prevention and Early Intervention Programs (OBH-CPEI) have taken some of that funding to create programs that promote the health and safety of Coloradans. These programs work on substance use prevention and early intervention.

Prevention Programs

If you suspect that a loved one is struggling with an addiction, it’s important that you get them help as soon as possible. Fortunately, there are quite a few prevention programs offered by Denver. Some target drug use among teenagers while adults specifically target the opioid epidemic that has plagued this city and county. Some of the prevention programs found in Colorado include:

There are also some outreach programs and centers that offer prevention programs as well. In most cases, concerned family members and parents are the people who will benefit most from these programs.

Early Intervention Programs

Catching an addiction before it worsens can make a whole world of a difference to the drug or alcohol abuser. Those who have abused substances for longer periods of time will usually be more dependent on the substance. They’ll also experience more intense withdrawal symptoms and will need more help.

Colorado has a Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) program that was funded by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and is now funded by the Office of Behavioral Health. This program helps minors and adults recognize signs of addiction and seek help for any substance use disorder (SUD).

Other Campaigns, Initiatives and Prevention Resources

Colorado also offers many other campaigns, initiatives and prevention resources to its citizens. If you ever need additional help, you can always consider reaching out to the following organizations:

  • One Step Ahead. This program educates parents and caregivers on substance use prevention.
  • Rise Above Colorado. This initiative deals with youth prescription drug misuse. This program is designed to empower teens to live a drug-free life.
  • Mental Health First Aid Colorado. This organization helps diagnose and treat both mental health disorders and substance use disorders.

There are also many National and Colorado Prevention Resources that are available. If you need any help finding the right organization and program, contact us. Our specialists will connect you with the right program for you.

Speak Now!

Created in 2011, Speak Now! Is a Colorado statewide social marketing campaign. This campaign encourages more conversation between parents and teenagers on topics surrounding substance use. This campaign provides evidence-based information and resources to parents and caregivers. It specifically targets youth substance abuse.

Alcoholics Anonymous Meetings

Alcoholics Anonymous offers support group meetings for people who want to stop drinking. The meetings are held on a weekly basis, and the groups may be either open or closed.

Denver AA Meetings

It is very easy to find AA meetings in Denver. There are many to choose from.

Attitude Adjustment
7:00 am
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Dawn Patrol
8:00 am on Saturdays and Sundays, 7:00 am Monday through Friday
1865 S. Pearl St.
Denver, CO
Map

Grupo El Principio
10:00 am & 7:30 pm
2420 S. Federal Blvd.
Denver, CO
Map

High Noon
12:30 pm Saturdays and Sundays
12:00 pm Monday through Friday
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

3PM How it Works
3:00 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

AWOL
12:00 pm daily
1:30 pm & 6:00 pm Saturdays and Sundays
2:00 pm & 5:30 pm Monday through Friday
1865 S. Pearl St.
Denver, CO
Map

5:45 Happy Hour
5:45 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Cherry Creek Promises
7:00 pm
St. John’s Church
700 S. Franklin St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Midtowne on the Park
7:00 pm
St. Barnabas’ Episcopal Church
1280 Vine St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Grupo El Alba
7:30 pm
3133 Peoria St. #205
Denver, CO
Map

Grupo El Buen Camino
7:30 pm
1679 47th Ave.
Denver, CO
Map

Grupo Honestidad
7:30 pm
2320 E. 49th Ave.
Denver, CO
Map

10 PM Last Call
10:00 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

R U Nutz?
5:30 am
1865 S. Pearl St.
Denver, CO
Map

Happy Trudgers
12:00 pm
Trinity United Methodist Church
1820 Broadway
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Grupo Renovacion
7:30 pm
3458 1st Ave.
Denver, CO
Map

Grupo Solo por Hoy
7:30 pm
Eagle Counseling Services
7131 Irving St. #202
Denver, CO
Map
Online

Additional AA Meetings:

AA Odrodzenie
8:00 am
2525 W. Evans Ave.
Denver, CO
Map

The Basics
8:00 am
Good Shepherd Catholic School
620 Elizabeth St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Sundays Fillmore
9:00 am
Capitol Heights Presbyterian Church
1100 Filmore St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Sunday Sobriety
9:30 am
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Bonanza at AWOL
10:30 am
1865 S. Pearl St.
Denver, CO
Map

York #1
11:00 am
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Grupo Renovacion
12:00 pm & 7:00 pm
3458 1st Ave.
Denver, CO
Map

Live and Let Live
12:30 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

The Next Step
5:30 pm
The Salvation Army – Crossroads Center
1901 29th St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Women’s Real Deal
5:45 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Foundation of Willingness
6:00 pm
Renewal Church
3120 Irving St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Sunday Nite Ticket
6:00 pm
University Park United Methodist Church
2180 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

100 Alibis
7:00 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Musicians Recovery
7:00 pm
Washington Park United Church of Christ
400 S. Williams St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Six Sixteen
7:00 pm
Platt Park Church
1601 S. Clarkson St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Guardian
8:00 pm
Christ Lutheran Church
2695 S. Franklin St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

The Way Out
8:00 pm
Denver CARES
1155 Cherokee
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Denver Serenity
8:30 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Artists N Recovery
10:00 am
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Came to Believe
12:00 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

We Care
12:00 pm
Risen Christ Catholic Parish
3060 S. Monaco Pkwy
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Women Serenity
12:00 pm
Kirk of Bonnie Brae United Church of Christ
1201 S. Steele St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Sunlight
5:45 pm
324 S. Sherman St.
Denver, CO
Map

Women’s BB Study
6:00 pm
Church of the Holy Redeemer
2552 Williams St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Emotional Sobriety
7:00 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Roaming Sisters
7:00 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Denver Young People
8:00 pm
Cypress Community Church
2122 S. Lafayette
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Fireside
8:00 pm
Brentwood United Methodist Church
1899 S. Irving
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Friends of Bill W.
8:00 pm
St. John’s Church
700 S. Franklin St.
Denver, CO
Map

Group 13
8:00 pm
University Park United Methodist Church
2180 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO
Map

Sho-Gro
8:00 pm
Berkeley Community Church
3701 W. 50th Ave.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Freestyle
8:30 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

One Step at a Time
12:00 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Nine to Five
6:00 pm
GLBT Community Center of Colorado
1301 E. Colfax Ave.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

That’s Life
6:00 pm
St. Thomas Episcopal Church
2201 Dexter St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Tuesday Nite Promises Discovered
6:00 pm
Denver Ballet School
100 Colo Blvd.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

The Ragamuffins
7:00 pm
Denver Community Church
1101 S. Washington St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Tornado Alley
7:00 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Green Light Tuesday
7:30 pm
St. John’s Cathedral
1350 Washington
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Happy Landings
7:30 pm
MCA Building
7350 E. 29th Ave. #300
Denver, CO
Map

Coming To
8:00 pm
Denver CARES
1155 Cherokee St.
Denver, CO
Map

Helpless No More
8:00 pm
777 Bannock St.
Denver, CO
Map

Open Splinter
8:00 pm
Christ Community Church
8085 E. Hampden
Denver, CO
Map

Sobriety
8:00 pm
Sobriety House
121 Acoma
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Spiritual Kindergarten
8:30 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Artists N Recovery
10:00 am
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Came to Believe
12:00 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

New Freedom
6:00 pm
Denver Ballet School
100 Colorado Blvd.
Denver, CO
Map

Nine to Five
6:00 pm
GLBT Community Center of Colorado
1301 E. Colfax Ave.
Denver, CO
Map

Still Willing
6:00 pm
3100 S. Sheridan Blvd.
Denver, CO
Map

Four Horsemen
6:30 pm
216 S. Grant St.
Denver, CO
Map

Jaywalkers
7:00 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Now H.O.W.
7:30 pm
Highlands Church
2644 W. 32nd
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Wonderful Gift
7:30 pm
Windsor Gardens
595 S. Clinton
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Pathway
8:00 pm
St. Michael & All Angels’ Episcopal Church
1400 S. University
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Gratitude
8:30 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Thursday Book Club
8:30 am
Kirk of Bonnie Brae United Church of Christ
1201 S. Steele St.
Denver, CO
Map

One Step at a Time
12:00 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Thursday Night Women
6:00 pm
Capitol Heights Presbyterian Church
1100 Filmore St.
Denver, CO
Map

Denver Thursday Night
6:15 pm
Central Presbyterian Church
1660 Sherman St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Courage to Change
6:30 pm
Belong Church
1615 Ogden St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

The Real Deal
6:30 pm
Christ Community Church
8085 E. Hampden
Denver, CO
Map

Bad Kitties
7:00 pm
1865 S. Pearl St.
Denver, CO
Map

Spearhead
7:00 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

TWFNM
7:00 pm
Phoenix Concept
2162 Lawrence St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Denver Thursday Night
7:30 pm
Central Presbyterian Church
1660 Sherman St.
Denver, CO
Map

Grateful 2B Here
7:30 pm
Stapleton Church
8700 E. 21st Ave.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Sobriety
8:00 pm
Sobriety House
121 Acoma
Denver, CO
Map

Participation
8:00 pm
Berkeley Community Church
3701 W. 50th Ave.
Denver, CO
Map

SE Sobriety
8:00 pm
Risen Christ Catholic Parish
3060 S. Monaco Pkwy
Denver, CO
Map

The Way Out
8:00 pm
Denver CARES
1155 Cherokee
Denver, CO
Map

York #1
8:30 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Came to Believe
12:00 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Nine to Five
6:00 pm
GLBT Community Center of Colorado
1301 E. Colfax Ave.
Denver, CO
Map

Four Horsemen
6:30 pm
216 S. Grant St.
Denver, CO
Map

Friday Night Spirits
7:00 pm
4380 Utica St.
Denver, CO
Map

Sobriety
7:00 pm
Sobriety House
121 Acoma
Denver, CO
Map

VA New Beginnings
7:00 pm
Rocky Mountain Regional VAMC
1700 N. Wheeling St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Working With Others
7:00 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

La Nueva Vida
7:30 pm
231 S. Osceola St.
Denver, CO
Map

Denver Young People
8:00 pm
Cypress Community Church
2122 S. Lafayette
Denver, CO
Map

Old Kent
8:00 pm
Central Christian Church
3690 Cherry Creek S. Drive
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Denver Serenity
8:30 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Six Sixteen
8:00 am
Platt Park Church
1601 S. Clarkson St.
Denver, CO
Map

Being Convinced
9:00 am
Christ Church United Methodist
690 Colorado Blvd.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Newcomers Friends
9:00 am
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Steps
9:00 am
Step Denver
2029 Larimer St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Four Horsemen
9:30 am
216 S. Grant St.
Denver, CO
Map

Park Hill Sobriety
10:00 am
Montview Boulevard Presbyterian Church
1980 Dahlia
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Emotional Sobriety
11:00 am
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Courage to Change
5:45 pm
Belong Church
1615 Ogden St.
Denver, CO
Map

Mile High Speaker
7:00 pm
The Salvation Army
2136 Champa St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Saturday Nite York
7:00 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

No-Name Group
7:30 pm
Washington Park United Church of Christ
400 S. Williams
Denver, CO
Map

Saturday Night South
8:00 pm
St. Mary’s Anglican Catholic Church
2290 S. Clayton
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Denver Serenity
8:30 pm
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

2 Minutes 2 Midnight
11:58 pm
1193 S. Bannock St.
Denver, CO
Map

Narcotics Anonymous Meetings

Narcotics Anonymous is much like AA, only it is for people with any type of addiction. They also meet on a weekly basis, and the meetings cover a variety of topics.

NA Meetings in Denver

There are several Denver NA meetings happening all week long. This is a complete list.

Christ Community Church
8:00 pm
8085 E. Hampden Ave.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Clubhouse
11:00 am
1193 South Bannock St.
Denver, CO
Map

Hope Crossing Church
5:00 pm
3000 South Wadsworth Blvd.
Lakewood, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

CeDAR Treatment Center
6:15 pm
1693 Quentin St.
Aurora, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Bethlehem Lutheran Church
7:00 pm
2100 Wadsworth Blvd.
Lakewood, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

New Beginnings Recovery Center
7:30 pm
191 E. Orchard Rd. #191-B
Littleton, CO
Map
Online

Central Presbyterian Church
12:00 pm
1660 N. Sherman St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Cadrec
8:00 pm Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays
7:45 pm Tuesdays
5:00 pm & 7:15 pm Saturdays
3315 Gilpin St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online

12 Steps to Freedom Club
9:30 pm
1510 Glen Ayr Drive
Unit 12
Lakewood, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Additional NA Meetings:

12 Steps to Freedom Club
12:00 pm
1510 Glen Ayr Drive
Unit 12
Lakewood, CO
Map

St. Mary’s Anglican Catholic Church
6:00 pm
2290 S. Clayton St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Washington Street Community Center
6:30 pm
809 South Washington St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook
Tuesday

Covenant Presbyterian Church
12:00 pm
5400 S. Yosemite St.
Greenwood Village, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Capitol Heights Presbyterian Church
5:45 pm
1100 Filmore St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Hope Crossing Church
6:30 pm
3000 S. Wadsworth Blvd.
Lakewood, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Bethlehem Lutheran Church
7:00 pm
2100 Wadsworth Blvd.
Lakewood, CO
Map

Westminster United Methodist Church
7:30 pm
3585 West 76th Ave.
Westminster, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Our Savior’s Lutheran Church
8:00 pm
915 E. 9th Ave.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

12 Steps to Freedom Club
12:00 pm, 5:30 pm & 7:30 pm
1510 Glen Ayr Drive
Unit 12
Lakewood, CO
Map

Covenant Presbyterian Church
12:00 pm
5400 S. Yosemite St.
Greenwood Village, CO
Map

First Presbyterian Church
6:45 pm
3500 S. Logan St.
Englewood, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

United Methodist Church
7:00 pm
6750 Carr St.
Arvada, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Our Savior’s Lutheran Church
8:00 pm
915 E. 9th Ave.
Denver, CO
Map

St. Barnabas’ Episcopal Church
6:50 am
1280 Vine St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Covenant Presbyterian Church
12:00 pm
5400 S. Yosemite St.
Greenwood Village, CO
Map

St. Peter and St. Mary Episcopal Church
5:30 pm
126 West 2nd St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

12 Steps to Freedom Club
5:30 pm
1510 Glen Ayr Drive
Unit 12
Lakewood, CO
Map

St. Francis Center Employment Services
7:30 pm
1630 E. 14th Ave.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Lakewood Christian Church
7:30 pm
2025 Kipling St.
Lakewood, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Intercession Episcopal Church
7:30 pm
3101 E. 100th Ave.
Thornton, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Covenant Presbyterian Church
12:00 pm
5400 S. Yosemite St.
Greenwood Village, CO
Map

12 Steps to Freedom Club
5:30 pm
1510 Glen Ayr Drive
Unit 12
Lakewood, CO
Map

Capitol Heights Presbyterian Church
5:45 pm
1100 Filmore St.
Denver, CO
Map

United Methodist Church
6:15 pm
1630 E. 14th Ave.
Denver, CO
Map

House of Purpose Church
7:00 pm
8720 E. Colfax Ave.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

A Holy Roller
7:00 pm
9360 E. Colfax Ave.
Denver, CO
Map
Online

West Pines Administration Building
7:30 pm
3400 Lutheran Pkwy
Wheat Ridge, CO
Map
Online

Phoenix Concept
8:00 pm
2162 Lawrence St.
Denver, CO
Map

First Presbyterian Church
8:00 pm
3500 S. Logan St.
Englewood, CO
Map

12 Steps to Freedom Club
7:00 am, 10:00 am, 12:00 pm, 6:30 pm, 8:00 pm
1510 Glen Ayr Drive
Unit 12
Lakewood, CO
Map

Capitol Heights Presbyterian Church
10:30 am
1100 Filmore St.
Denver, CO
Map

Hope Crossing Church
5:00 pm
3000 S. Wadsworth Blvd.
Lakewood, CO
Map

Our Savior’s Lutheran Church
7:00 pm
915 E. 9th Ave.
Denver, CO
Map

First Presbyterian Church
8:00 pm
3500 S. Logan St.
Englewood, CO
Map

United Methodist Church
10:30 pm
1630 E. 14th Ave.
Denver, CO
Map

Sobriety House
9:30 am
121 Acoma St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Cadrec
9:30 am
3315 Gilpin St.
Denver, CO
Map

12 Steps to Freedom Club
10:00 am
1510 Glen Ayr Drive
Unit 12
Lakewood, CO
Map

Porter Hospital Mental Health Facility
10:30 am
2465 S. Downing St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Al-Anon Meetings for Families

Al-Anon is an organization that was founded as a way to help the families of alcoholics and drug addicts. Families can attend weekly meetings, and there are even special groups for teenagers. This is a part of Al-Anon called Alateen.

Denver Al-Anon Meetings

Going to an Al-Anon meeting in Denver can be a very rewarding experience. There are several to choose from.

Loving Detachment AFG
8:15 am
1311 York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Path to Freedom AFG
10:00 am
1865 S. Pearl St.
Denver, CO
Map

Just for Today AFG
6:00 pm
Sobriety House
121 Acoma St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Noon Group AFG
12:00 pm
Trinity Methodist Church
1820 Broadway
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Stepping Stones AFG
8:00 pm
University Park United Methodist Church
2180 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Noon Group AFG
12:00 pm
Trinity Methodist Church
1820 Broadway
Denver, CO
Map

Highlands AFG Tuesday Night
6:30 pm
Highlands Church at Holiday Theater
2644 W. 32nd Ave.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Joy AFG
7:30 pm
St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral
1350 Washington St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Noon Group AFG
12:00 pm
Trinity Methodist Church
1820 Broadway
Denver, CO
Map

Promises of AFG
7:00 pm
York Street Club
1311 York St.
Denver, CO
Map

Forgiveness AFG
8:00 pm
University Park United Methodist Church
2180 S. University Blvd.
Denver, CO
Map

Noon Group AFG
12:00 pm
Trinity Methodist Church
1820 Broadway
Denver, CO
Map
Friday

Noon Group AFG
12:00 pm
Trinity Methodist Church
1820 Broadway
Denver, CO
Map

Park Hill AFG
12:00 pm
St. Thomas Episcopal Church
2201 Dexter St.
Denver, CO
Map
Online
Facebook

Path to Freedom AFG
10:00 am
1865 S. Pearl St.
Denver, CO
Map

Centered Saturday For Adult Children AFG
4:30 pm
South Denver Medical Building
2465 S. Downing St.
Denver, CO
Map

Alcohol and Drug Detox and Rehab Facilities

Professional assistance may be absolutely necessary for some instances. Those who are struggling with a moderate to serious addiction and those who might experience life-threatening withdrawal symptoms, like delirium tremens. Some addicts may need professional help because they’re not in a safe and secure place. They may come from a troubled home environment. Or, they may be surrounded by other substance abusers.

Professional substance abuse treatment usually comes in two parts. Recovering substance abusers start off with detox. Detox help ease toxins from the body and prepare the addict physically.

Once the patients are physically healthy, they move onto the rehab portion of the treatment. This usually involves counseling, behavioral therapy and more. This part of the treatment process helps recovering addicts learn what their triggers are and how to deal with them. They also help treat psychological struggles and issues that may have led the addiction in the first place.

Both components are necessary for a successful recovery and lifelong sobriety. There are, of course, many different options to choose from.

Detox Centers in Denver, Colorado

There are over 15 detox centers in Denver, Colorado for both drug and alcohol addiction. That’s a lot of options to choose from. These detox centers offer both medical detox and holistic detox services. When looking for the right detox program, consider whether an outpatient or inpatient program will work best. In general, it’s best to stay with an inpatient program, as you’ll receive a high level of care and supervision.

Detox services usually last only as long as the withdrawal symptoms do. In most cases, the detox portion of treatment will only take anywhere from 7 to 14 days to complete. By then, most alcohol and drug abusers will have overcome the physical withdrawal symptoms. Their body chemistry will start to normalize.

Medical Detox Services

Medical detox services rely on medications to help ease withdrawal symptoms. The medications attach to receptors in the brain to normalize brain chemistry levels. This helps to ward off physical withdrawal symptoms.

Medical detox services can also treat co-occurring mental health disorders, like anxiety and depression.

Different types of medications are used in medical detox. The dose and type of medication prescribed will depend on the drug that the patient is addicted to, the type of withdrawal symptoms that they are experiencing and the intensity of the symptoms. Each patient will also respond to a different cocktail of drugs. It all depends on their biological makeup.

There are two types of medications: FDA-approved drugs and non-FDA-approved drugs. FDA-approved drugs include methadone for treating opiate withdrawals and acamprosate for treating alcohol withdrawals. These drugs are approved specifically by the FDA to treat that addiction. Non-FDA-approved drugs including sleeping pills. These drugs are used to treat a specific symptom.

Holistic Detox Services

Holistic detox services are quite different from medical detox services. These detox services are often used as a supplement to medical detox services, as medical detox is absolutely necessary in some cases.

Unlike medical detox, holistic detox services do not rely on any medications or chemicals at all. Instead, this type of detox service relies on using natural approaches to deal with withdrawal symptoms.

Some holistic detox services include:

  • Exercise therapy. Patients who exercise are more likely to boost brain chemistry levels naturally. This can help ease withdrawal symptoms and make recovery a lot more comfortable.
  • Nutritional therapy. Knowing what to eat can really help your body stay healthy during recovery. Nutritional therapy involves not only eating a balanced meal but also staying hydrated. This is particularly important for those who are losing fluids through diarrhea or vomiting.
  • Divine feminism. Different spiritual theories and concepts can also help patients get through recovery.

Holistic detox services can include a wide array of different things. Each patient will try a combination of different activities to find out what works best for him or her.

Denver, CO Alcohol and Drug Rehab Centers

Patients who have completed a detox program can then move onto a rehab program. Residents of Denver, Colorado are in luck because there are many inpatient and outpatient alcohol and drug rehab centers in this area. This means that there are plenty of choices to choose from.

There are over 15 inpatient alcohol and drug rehab centers and over 15 outpatient rehab facilities in Denver, Colorado. Most rehab facilities that offer inpatient care also offer outpatient care. Also, most rehab centers in Denver that offer an alcohol addiction treatment program will also offer a drug addiction treatment program.

When choosing the right rehab facility in Denver, CO, you need to consider the following:

  • The level of care that you need. Patients will move into an inpatient treatment center. As a result, they get a high level of care and supervision. With outpatient treatment, patients can come and go as they please.
  • The cost of the treatment program. Addiction treatment can be costly.
  • Whether the rehab facility accepts your insurance program. Denver Women’s Recovery accepts quite a few health insurance plans. You can always verify your insurance with us to get an idea of the type of coverage you have.
  • The type of treatments offered. This includes whether the rehab facility offers behavioral therapies, like Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) for treating trauma and addiction.
  • The amenities that the rehab center can provide. Some rehab facilities offer equine therapy, while others may even offer spa treatments.

Knowing what you need is the first step to choosing a compatible and suitable treatment program. Don’t hesitate to ask questions. Before you commit to a rehab program, consider getting a tour of the facility. This will give you a better idea of what you can expect.

Benefits of Inpatient Treatment

  • An intense level of care. With inpatient treatment, patients will be under constant supervision. If their condition changes at any point, they will immediately get the medical attention that they need.
  • Easy access to therapies and treatment modalities. Staying at the rehab center has its perks. Patients can immediately get the addiction treatment services that they need without having to wait. They can speak with a doctor, a psychiatrist or a nurse at a moment’s notice.
  • A new environment that’s free of negative influences. The drug and alcohol rehab center is the perfect place to stay. Patients enjoy a new environment that’s calm and peaceful. They are also away from stressful situations and triggers.
  • Structured daily schedules. With a structured daily schedule, patients will learn how to live a healthy and normal life. Patients will wake up early in the morning and then complete an array of treatments.
  • Ability to network with people in similar situations. Those in inpatient rehab will get to meet others who are in similar situations. They’ll turn to these people for help when they feel lost or hopeless. Many patients continue to stay in contact even after leaving the treatment facility.

Benefits of Outpatient Care

  • Affordability. Outpatient treatment programs tend to cost only a fraction of inpatient programs. Also, most health insurance plans will cover the entire cost of outpatient treatment.
  • Freedom to keep up current responsibilities. Those who choose outpatient care have the ability to complete their current work, school, and home obligations. They can continue to go to work and/or school.
  • Ability to implement or try out skills that they learn. Since patients are in a familiar environment, they can try out all of the skills and techniques that they have learned from outpatient care. This will give them a better idea of what works and what doesn’t.
  • Flexibility with time. Patients can choose from a wide array of outpatient programs, from partial hospitalization programs to intensive outpatient programs and more. They can decide how much time they would like to commit to receiving treatment.
  • Choice of living at home. Many people don’t actually change their environment. These people may prefer the comfort of their own home.

Gender-Specific Rehab Facilities

When looking for a rehab program that may work for you, consider whether you need a gender-specific program. These programs are designed for a specific gender. So, if you’ll be joining a group therapy session, everyone that attends will either be a female or a male. If you are living in a gender-specific residential rehab center, all the patients will either be females or males.

Gender-specific rehab programs also take into account the unique factors that affect each gender, as well as how each gender reacts to an addiction. They are able to treat many psychological issues at their core instead of merely brushing the surface. Many people would agree that gender-specific rehab facilities tend to be a lot more private and intimate. Some patients claim that they feel safer or feel more comfortable opening up about their struggles.

“Women who receive treatment in gender-sensitive programs are more likely to be employed 12 months after treatment admission than women in more traditional treatment programs. Additionally, women who complete treatment have greater odds of being employed than women not completing treatment. This research is of particular importance since women with substance abuse disorders have reported barriers to employment, which can be a protective factor against relapse.”

~ National Institute on Drug Abuse

Women, in general, tend to respond more positively to gender-specific treatments. These types of treatment programs identify physiological differences between men and women and treat women accordingly. They also give women an opportunity to open up about intimate issues, like sexual trauma. They make women feel less vulnerable.

Sober Living Homes in Denver

There are about 9 sober living homes in Denver, Colorado. Sober living homes are usually part of an aftercare plan. You can decide to live in a sober living home after completing an addiction treatment program. The sober living environment will keep you on track and prevent you from relapsing.

While you are free to come and go as you please, you cannot have any alcohol or drugs if you are staying at a sober living home. You will also be expected to complete certain chores or take part in certain group therapies with the other residents. You’ll live in a sober living home while you go to work and try to get your life back in order. This is the perfect transition from an addiction treatment program to independent living.

With a sober living home, you’ll still be expected to pay “rent”. You may also need to pay for groceries and any other expenses that you have. It’s basically like living in an apartment building or a house with other people who are also in recovery. If you ever need help, you can turn to the other residents or the addiction experts that are on-site.

Denver Women’s Recovery offers gender-specific sober living arrangements for women. Many women find a gender-specific arrangement to be more comfortable. They feel more open with the other residents and are more willing to participate in group activities.

How to Learn More About Drug and Alcohol Recovery Resources for Denver, CO

It’s possible that you still have a lot of questions about your options for recovery. Denver Women’s Recovery is here to help you. It is possible that you need to approach recovery with some professional help. You may need detox and rehab. If that is the case, we can assist you.

Denver Addiction Resources

Please contact us right away to get more information.